If Your Nail Paint Changes Color When Dipped In A Drink, Call 911 Right Away!

The changing nail paint.

 The changing nail paint.

Branded as Undercover Colors, this nail paint is a little peculiar.
Unlike normal nail paints, this peculiar nail paint changes color when dipped in a certain kind of a drink.

The brains behind it.

The brains behind it.

A group of four young men (college students to be precise) Tyler Confrey-Maloney, Ankesh Madan, Stephen Gray, and Tasso Von Windheim, decided to develop a nail paint that can detect date rape drugs like roofies.
Their aim is to empower women so that they can protect themselves from such nefarious men who do not blink an eyelid before peeping into a woman's blouse.

How will it help?

How will it help?

This nail paint by Undercover Colors will help in detecting the date rape drugs when dipped in a drink that has been drugged.
This will alert the woman of the intentions of men hanging out with her, and she can instantly escape or call 911 to report the matter.
You move your eyes off the drink for a second, and this is enough time for the culprits to spring into action and drop a drug in your glass.
In a few minutes, you will be losing yourself to their evil plans while the miscreants enjoy your vulnerable state.
This nail paint is an effort to pour water over any such quietly pervasive and heinous crimes by alerting women.

Their social media presence.

Their social media presence.

Undercover Colors are present on Facebook and Instagram.
They keep their keen observers up to date with their progress on their company website as well as through their social media accounts.

How are people reacting to this idea?

How are people reacting to this idea?

While it sounds like a welcome idea to many, some critics find this idea of drug-detecting nail polish unfeasible.
Rape prevention advocates are of the view that this idea of drug-detecting nail paint puts the onus of preventing rapes and sexual harassment on the potential victims and is in no way an effort to bring an end to such vile acts.
Feminist writer Jessica Valenti wrote in a column for the Guardian, "I'm appreciative that young men like to want to curb sexual assault, but anything that puts the onus on women to 'discreetly' keep from being raped misses the point.
We should be trying to stop rape, not just individually avoid it.
Prevention tips or products that focus on what women do or wear aren't just ineffective; they leave room for victim-blaming when those steps aren't taken.
Didn't wear your anti-rape underwear? Well, what did you expect?"

Where can you buy it from?

Where can you buy it from?

This wearable nail technology is still in the development stage and yet to be made available commercially.
You can follow them on Facebook or Instagram for latest updates of this drug-detecting nail polish.

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